Category Archives: Open air galleries

Time Is Gold

Time Is Gold is the name of the last production supervised by Scaner before he passed away in early September 2017. Most of his closest buddies in crews KG, DA and Four S as well as a few other friends from the Montreal graffiti scene were invited by him to contribute. The production was halfway completed at the time of Scaner’s death, so it then turned into a tribute to the writer the Montreal graff community calls their king. A candle memorial at the base of his unfinished piece was actually where his friends would congregate for a few weeks following the day Scaner passed.

The production is found on the back and side walls as well as around the playground of a private high school in central/eastern Montreal. The premises are therefore only partially accessible and should be respected.

Time Is Gold est le nom de la dernière production dirigée par Scaner avant son décès au début de septembre 2017. La plupart des ses frères dans les crews KG, DA et Four S ainsi que quelques très bons amis de la scène montréalaise du graff ont répondu à son invitation de contribuer à la production. Puisque que celle-ci n’était qu’à demi complétée au moment du décès de Scaner, elle est par la suite devenue un hommage à l’artiste que la communauté montréalaise du graff nomme maintenant son “king”. D’ailleurs un mémorial à la chandelle à la base de sa dernière pièce demeurée inachevée était l’endroit où ses amis sont venus se recueillir et lui rendre hommage pendant quelques semaines suite à son départ.

La production se trouve sur les murs arrière et latéral ainsi qu’autour du terrain de jeu d’une école privée du centre-est de Montréal. Celle-ci n’est conséquemment que partiellement accessible et le coté privé de l’endroit devrait être respecté.

The production’s main wall. Scaner did the outlines of his letters before he passed away. The fill and background of that area were completed by his brothers in KG, Stare and Zek. On the left is Scaner’s crewmate in the Four S’s, Harry Bones.

Top left on the adjacent wall is Cemz.

Serack

Beneath Cemz and Serack is Dodo Osé‘s part.

Sewk (above) and Stare (below).

Ware on letters and mural. More by Ware below.

Axe (top letters and figurative) and Jaber (ground letters). Both have supplied more, scroll down.

Smak

Zek

One more bit by Axe, this is King the squirrel.

Wall of flops featuring Zek, Stare, Deep, Pito, Her, F.One, Jaber, Axe, Some, Shok, Tuna, Oper, Getsa, Zion, Dolar, Casp, Smak, Morz, Peace, Expos, Nixon and many others (feel free to let me know about anyone I have been unable to identify).

Tribute to Jays by Jaker, Peace and Legal (almost completed – finished shot will be put up when the wall is completed).

One more by Jaber, this time his character.

Soten

Trace

Hoacs

Shok

Mersh

123Klan‘s Scien.

Shok

Ware

Sober

Morz

Soma

Pask

Wase

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Under Pressure Festival 2017

Here’s a photo gallery featuring all the works produced during the 2017 edition of the Under Pressure Festival. For earlier editions see the following posts:
2016 edition
2015 edition
2014 edition
2013 edition.

Cet article-photo présente les oeuvres produites au cours de l’édition 2017 du Festival Under Pressure. Pour les éditions antérieures, voir les articles suivants:
édition 2016
édition 2015
édition 2014
édition 2013.

One of 2 posters for the 2017 edition, by Haks and Jimmy Baptiste.

One of 2 posters for the 2017 edition, by Haks and Jimmy Baptiste.


203 crew wall. The 203 Invader with the munchies is by Opire and the one with the giggles is by Arnold and Borrris. The top letters – actually numbers 203 – are by Naimo, the ground ones by Ekes and all the wraparound is by Lyfer and Ekes plus probably a few more 203s…

Monk.e, Fonki and Ankh One collaboration.

The 123 Klan wall with Scien and Klor on ground level letters and Aiik on top ones.

Rouks (top left), Lapin (top right), Haks (ground left) and Nemo (ground right).

K6A crew wall featuring Axe, Fleo, Dodo Osé, etc. (segment 1/3).

K6A crew wall featuring Axe, Fleo, Dodo Osé, etc. (segment 2/3).

K6A crew wall featuring Axe, Fleo, Dodo Osé, etc. (segment 3/3).

Yekso, Lons, Zyon and Kuby, guests from New Caledonia.

RCD and guests wall featuring, from left to right and top to bottom: Imp, Phere, Sirvis, Snok, Vogue, Yema, Bumpr and Mask. See close-ups of individual pieces below.

Imp

Phere

Sirvis

Snok

Vogue

Yema

Bumpr

Mask

TFS/POM wall featuring, from left to right and top to bottom: Rizek, Apok, Resok, Myrage, Eskro, Serum and EK Sept. See close-ups of individual pieces below.

Rizek and Resok.

Apok and Myrage.

Eskro

Serum (better and unobstructed shot coming).

EK Sept

Anthill Collective wall featuring Capes, Eskae and Speak with guest AboveAsBelow.

UNC wall featuring Meor, Baesr, Getso, Rock and Mine.

Collaboration between SBU One and MSHL.

Scribe on letters, Tchug on central character and Corey Bulpitt on native motifs.

Serna (top), Gaulois (bottom left) and Bopor (bottom right). See close-ups of the two bottom pieces below.

Gaulois

Bopor

Debza

Tibúron

Corey Bulpitt

Kor for his Mon Chat Dans Ta Ville project.

Striker

Tryptich by Adida Fallen Angel.

Ason, with Vogue above.

MC Baldassari and Aude Maeva.

Osmoze

Dalkhafine and Loopkin.

Hoar

Asyn

NEMC / Fabb

Marc-André Giguère

Marc-André Giguère

Le Monstr

Elysanne Tremblay (left) and Le Monstr (right).

Jasp

M’Os Geez

Maliciouz

Tchekon

Tchekon

Chase aka Smile

Wheatpaste by Mono Sourcil (1/2).

Wheatpaste by Mono Sourcil (2/2).

Wheatpaste by Maliciouz (1/3).

Wheatpaste by Maliciouz (2/3).

Wheatpaste by Maliciouz (3/3).

Wheatpaste by Carolina Espinosa (1/3).

Wheatpaste by Carolina Espinosa (2/3).

Wheatpaste by Carolina Espinosa (3/3).

Wheatpaste by Christina Mazzulla (1/2).

Wheatpaste by Christina Mazzulla (2/2).

Closed porn cinema covered with Miss Me wheatpastes. Pasted messages include “To be born with a woman’s body is to bear the unsolicited burden of humanity’s unresolved attitudes towards sex” and “Don’t tell me what to wear”. See below for close-up.

Close-up of some Miss Me wheatpastes from above installation.

Festival de Canes

Over the weekend of 15-16 July 2017, approximately 40 out of the best of Greater Montreal’s writers and artists were invited by Dose Culture to cover the 2 sides of a highway ramp in Longueuil with their work. The event was titled the Festival de Canes (‘Cans Festival’, a pun on Cannes Festival). Most of the space to be covered was split into sections allotted to various crews. The line-up was curated by Acek.

Au cours de la fin de semaine du 15-16 juillet 2017, environ 40 des meilleurs artistes/graffeurs de la région de Montréal on été invités par Dose Culture pour recouvrir les 2 cotés d’une rampe d’accès du pont Jacques-Cartier, coté Longueuil. Le nom de l’événement, le Festival de Canes, est bien sur un jeu de mot sur Festival de Cannes. La majorité de l’espace de travail a été séparé en sections allouées à divers crews. La sélection des graffeurs a été effectuée par Acek.


N2N’s wall featuring curator Acek (top right), Janek (ground right), Arose (top left) and Nerv (bottom left). All four contributed to the background.

K6A‘s wall featuring Axe Lalime, Dodo Osé, Fleo, Saer, Serak, Monk.e and Osti One. See below for close-up details.

Close-up detail of the K6A wall shown above.

Close-up detail of the K6A wall shown above.

Besides contributing to the K6A wall, Monk.e also did his own.

203 crew wall featuring, from left to right and from ground to top: Ekes, Nybar, Arnold, Borrris, Naimo, Hitem, Lyfer and Trak.

Close-up on Ekes‘s piece on the 203 crew wall shown above.

Close-up on Nybar‘s piece on the 203 crew wall shown above.

Close-up on Arnold‘s piece on the 203 crew wall shown above.

Close-up on Borrris‘s piece on the 203 crew wall shown above.

Close-up on Naimo‘s piece for on 203 crew wall shown above.

Close-up on Hitem‘s piece for on 203 crew wall shown above.

Close-up on Lyfer‘s piece for on 203 crew wall shown above.

Close-up on Trak’s piece for on 203 crew wall shown above.

Crazy Apes wall featuring Fezat and Narc on central part, with letters by Lith (top left), Crane (ground left), Korb (top right) and Akuma (ground right).

Close-up on Fezat and Narc‘s central part of the Crazy Apes wall shown above.

Close-up on Lith‘s piece on the Crazy Apes wall shown above.

Close-up on Crane‘s piece on the Crazy Apes wall shown above.

Close-up on Korb‘s piece on the Crazy Apes wall shown above.

Close-up on Akuma‘s piece on the Crazy Apes wall shown above.

Next Time crew wall featuring Rouks (character), Sank (top left letters), Wonez (ground left letters) and Royal (right).

Detail of of the Next Time crew wall showing Rouks (character), Sank (top letters), Wonez (ground letters).

Detail of of the Next Time crew wall showing Rouks (character) and Royal (letters).

Debza

Scribe

Robe/Fore

Killa EF (ground), Kare (above).

Legal (ground), Jaker (above).

Deeper

Bfour

Fokus on bus side.

Opposite side of the above bus, by Awe. This was completed too late for me to photograph on site, so it was shot a few weeks later in NDG.

Scan You Rock

Over the weekend of 22-23 April 2017 the Montreal graffiti community got together to celebrate Scaner, one of this city’s best and most respected writers/artists. For the occasion, the walls of the MPC Papers building on the corner of Cabot and Gilmore in the South West (a Montreal graffiti hotspot) were completely redone by over two dozens of Montreal’s best writers and artists, plus friends of Scaner’s who traveled from as far as the USA and Barcelona for the occasion. All in all, nearly 40 new pieces were created during the weekend, they are all shown in the gallery below.

The building where the event took place has been in the past the site of graffiti gatherings such as Meeting Of Styles/Can You Rock. This is why the event was unofficially dubbed with the pun Scan You Rock and the name stuck.

See also:
Wall2wallMTL photo spotlight on Scaner
pre-Scan You Rock photo gallery of the Cabot x Gilmore walls

Au cours du weekend du 22-23 avril 2017 la communauté graffiti montréalaise s’est réunie pour célébrer Scaner, un de nos meilleurs artistes dans ce domaine, et sans contredit un des plus respectés. Pour l’occasion, les murs de l’édifice MPC Papers au coin de Cabot et de Gilmore dans le sud-ouest (un hotspot graffiti de Montréal) ont été complètement refaits par au moins deux douzaines des meilleurs artistes montréalais du graffiti ainsi que par quelques amis graffeurs de Scaner qui sont venus d’aussi loin que des Etats-Unis et de Barcelone pour l’occasion. En tout, près d’une quarantaine de nouvelles pièces ont été créées au cours de cette fin de semaine, elles sont toutes présentées dans la gallerie ci-dessous.

L’édifice où l’événement a eu lieu a par le passé été le site de festivals graffiti tels que Meeting Of Styles/Can You Rock. C’est ainsi que quelqu’un a officieusement baptisé l’événement du jeu de mot Scan You Rock, et le nom est resté.

A voir aussi:
profil photo Wall2wallMTL sur Scaner
gallerie-photo des murs Cabot x Gilmore, pré-Scan You Rock


Cabot side

The celebrated man himself, Scaner.

Above Scaner’s piece is this bird of prey by Axe flying off with Scaner’s iconic ‘Mr Can Do’.

Hsix

Scaner’s crewmate in KG, Stare.

Eskae from Miami.

Roachi from Brooklyn via Sydney.

Hoacs from New York.

Soten from Copenhagen / New York.

Trace from New York.

Scaner’s crewmate in KG, Zek.

Jat from Brooklyn.

Harry Bones from Barcelona.

Musa from Barcelona.

Kemr from Boston.

Awe

ATWZ

Cemz (top) and Smak (ground level).

Nixon (top) and Sober (ground level).


Gilmore side

Jaker (top), Legal (middle) and Johste (ground).

Earth Crusher

The AG Crew‘s Snipes and Senk.

The 123Klan’s Scien.

The 123Klan’s Klor.

Scaner’s crewmate in KG, Jaber.

Sino

Narc

Shok

Pito

Skor

Some

Sewk

Kemt


building end

Fleo (blue), Dodo Osé (red letters) and Axe (character)

The “Jailspot”

The “Jailspot” is the name given by graffiti writers and urban explorers to two contiguous abandoned buildings on Henri-Bourassa at the level of the now closed Tanguay prison. These buildings were not actually part of the closed prison, they belonged to Transport Québec who once used them as hangars for heavy machinery. They appear to have been used in the recent past as offices and warehouse space. The westernmost of the two is older than the other one which seems to have been built around 2006-2007. For the following years the latter new construction was used for sporadic warehouse sales.

Business must not have been very good, the buildings were left unused as early as 2011-2012 and signs of graffiti action started appearing, first outside then inside. Within a few years the two buildings were completely taken over by explorers and writers/artists. Everything except the warehouse at the front of the easternmost building quickly deteriorated, through the combined actions of vandals and rain/snow through broken doors and windows as well as collapsed roofs. The two buildings were finally gradually demolished over the spring and summer of 2016 to make space for the construction of controversial residential/commercial towers.

If you have any additional information about this spot, feel free to write in and contribute to this article.

The gallery below is divided by rooms and other areas where artists left their mark. The names of the rooms are not official ones, I just came up with them for comprehensive purposes. A plan of the spot can be seen below, at the top of the gallery.

Le “Jailspot” est le nom donné par les graffeurs et explorateurs urbains à deux édifices voisins sur Henri-Bourassa devant l’ancienne prison Tanguay. Ces deux édifices ne font en fait pas partie de l’ancienne prison, ils appartenaient à Transport Québec et ont déjà servi de hangars pour de la machinerie lourde. Ils semblent avoir ensuite servi de bureaux et d’entrepôts au cours des années précédant leur abandon. Celui situé le plus à l’ouest semble dater d’avant l’autre qui a été construit vers 2006-2007. Au cours des années qui ont suivi sa construction ce dernier a été le lieu de ventes d’entrepôt.

Les affaires n’ont pas dû être très profitables, déjà vers 2011-2012 les édifices n’étaient plus utilisés et les graffeurs ont commencé à arriver sur les lieux, d’abord à l’extérieur ensuite à l’intérieur. Très rapidement l’endroit a été pris d’assaut par les explorateurs urbains et les graffeurs. Tout sauf les pièces du devant s’est rapidement détérioré, sous l’action de vandales et de la pluie/neige entrant par les portes et fenêtres brisées ainsi que des portions de toits effondrés. Les deux édifices ont finalement été démolis au cours du printemps et de l’été 2016 pour permettre la construction de controversées tours résidentielles et commerciales.

Si vous détenez de l’information additionnelle sur cet endroit, vous êtes invités à me contacter et contribuer à cet article.

La gallerie-photo ci-dessous est divisée en pièces et autres zones où les artistes ont oeuvré. Les noms des différentes pièces ne sont pas officiels, ils sont ceux que j’ai utilisés pour mes besoins d’archivage. Le plan ci-dessous montre les positions relatives de ces pièces.


Plan of the various rooms and areas. The codes E1 to E6 and W1 to W5 refer to the room sub-sections below. Click to expand.


Eastern building

Street view from Henri-Bourassa, 2015. Visible in the front are abandoned limousines!

Different angle; visible at the back is the dome of the old Tanguay prison which gave this spot its name amongst writers and urban explorers.


E1 – the galleries

General view of the galleries on the right, and the central rooms on the left.

Kems/Kemr

Skor

Skor

Skor

Skor

Kemt

Tuna

Shok

Shok

Shok

Shok

Shok from a Four Lokos prod.

Skor from a Four Lokos prod.

Narc from a Four Lokos prod.

Tuna from a Four Lokos prod.

Tuna (ground level), Koni (above left) and Saner (above right).

Tuna

Tuna

Tuna representing the SIK crew.

Ekler (left) and Tuna (right). Visible above are throws by Hems (left) and Shake (right).

Narc

Korb

Lith

Geser

Aper

Sunz

Naimo

Lyfer

Getsa

Shrek One tribute to Jacques Parizeau.

Ekler (ground level) and Serum (above).

Serum

EK Sept (left) and Hope (right). Visible above is a tag by Daym.

EK Sept. Scroll up for shots of the Sunz and Hope pieces seen beneath.

Fokus

Pito

Oskar

Nixon

Dope

Arek

Dekor (letters) and Hesan (creature).

Hesan

Two forms of Dekor on sides of the window. Tags above are by Sunz (in black) and Nybar (in blue).

Dekor (left) and Rizek (right).

Talk


E2 – the car showroom

General view of the car showroom. Scroll down for close-ups of the Geser car and the Merp and Raker pieces seen at the back.

Geser

Algue representing 203.

Pro

Someone representing the VC crew.

Lyfer

Block

Faboo representing Ten Yen.

Aces

Aner

Raker (ground level) and Merp (above).

Same spot, earlier shot: Verse (ground level) and Merp (above).


E3 – the central room

General view of the central room, with the back side of the car showroom on the left.

Skor

Skor

Aces

Bewet

Neak


E4 – the warehouse

General view of the warehouse (sorry for the blurry shot, it’s the only one I have). Scroll down for a close-up of the few visible pieces in this shot.

Shok

Narc

Skam

Dekor

Dekor

Dekor

Dekor (ground level), with Neak and Bwet above.

Singe. Tags on the right include those of Dekor, Bewet, etc.

Ecler, plus a yellow tag by Bewet.

Rizek

Bewet

Oskar

Meth

Gypsr, perhaps with someone else.

Gypsr


E5 – the offices

Ekler

Ekler

Veto

Ecler throw.

Rizek


E6 – the end room

Bask and Part. Two red tags by Shok above.

Big throw from Etos, plus red tags by Shok.


Eastern building – outside walls

General view of the end of one of the buildings. Scroll down for close-ups.

Throw from Scaner.

Lyfer

Lyfer (ground level left), Cler (ground level right) and Balis (above).

Lyfer and Babar at ground level, Sneak and Venise above right.

Lyfer

Lyfer

Ekes

Tuna representing the SIK crew (ground level), Balis (top left)

Shok. Tags by Getsa and Gnius above.

Nixon

What’s left of an old Nixon piece.

Bosny

Reebok aka Logre.

Reebok aka Logre.

Gnius

Gnius

Gnius

Raker

Kzam (bottom left), Jaws (bottom right), Ecler (yellow) and anonymous artist (text and prisoner).

Wase (top left), Jaws (top right), Rescue (bottom left)

Getsa

EK Sept. Tags by Mesk (black) and Venise (white) above.

EK Sept

Oper

This reads Fofo but I’m quite sure it’s Fiefo.

Ecler

Kelen (left) and Shake (right)

Clast

Pares (ground level) and Arows (top).

Some (ground level)

Obes

Mastrocola (2 colour swirls), Hitem (yellow throw).

Unidentified artist.

Unidentified artist.

Sceak (character), Bask (top tag).


Eastern building – roof pieces

Lyfer

Lyfer

Ekes

Ekes

Algue

Bosny

Aloke


Western building

Street view from Henri-Bourassa, 2016. Also visible on the right is a corner of the Eastern building.


W1 – the long room

General view of the long room. Scroll down for close-ups of the various pieces visible in this shot.

Shok (ground level) and Crops (above)

Fruit (left), Epos (middle) and Crack (right); red tag by Guest bottom left.

Same spot, later: Dekor (left) and Crack (right).

Crack (left), Ecler (right) and Duke (above).

Ekler on garage door, with partial view on the inner courtyard. Partially visible above are a throw and tag by Blek.

Hitem

Gaist/Guest

Cur?

Daym

Uzem

Scek


W2 – the small room

Aper and Sunz.

Nixon, with a blue tag by Scaner above.

Same spot, later: Deser.

Ensor

Jinx


W3 – the medium room

Apashe

Nixon

Vogue

Gnius, plus tag by Rake above.

Rake

Raes

Raes

Peace

Alber

Ekual (ground level) and Arow (above).

Feez


W4 – the courtyard

General view of the inner courtyard. Scroll down for close-ups of the various pieces.

Stare

Shok

Monk.e

EK Sept (bottom left), Kelen (top left), Zion (top right) and Sunz (bottom right).

Ekler

Ekler

Ekler

Dekor

Rake. Tags by VC‘s Owk and Sunz above.

Gnius (top left of door), Blek (right of door), Arose (very top)

Jaws (ground level) and Bane (above).

Aper

Scaner (blue) and Crops (yellow).

Taike, plus a tag by Owk in black on the right.


W5 – the annex

Bane


Western builing – outside walls

Raker (ground level), Gnius (middle) and someone for SPK (above).

F.One in small and large formats.

Kzam (ground level), Bane (above left), Duke (above right), Shake (top right).

Smog

Raker (left) and Ecro (right).

A throw by Aero and a tag by Kelen.

KC Neuf

Someone representing YU8.

Under Pressure Festival 2016

Here’s a photo gallery featuring all the works produced during the 2016 edition of the Under Pressure Festival. For earlier editions see the following posts:
2017 edition
2015 edition
2014 edition
2013 edition.

Cet article-photo présente les oeuvres produites au cours de l’édition 2016 du Festival Under Pressure. Pour les éditions antérieures, voir les articles suivants:
édition 2017
édition 2015
édition 2014
édition 2013.


K6A wall featuring Axe (raccoons), Serak (bottom left), Otak (middle left), Satyr (top left), Fleo (top right), Dodo Osé (middle right) and Fluke (bottom right).

Kuby (top), Haks (middle) and Nemo (bottom).

Ankh One (top), Eskro (middle), Apok (bottom right) and OG Katz (bottom left).

Serna (top), Asyne (middle), Minus Two (bottom letters) and Rouks (bird; from larger piece, see below)

Rouks (woman and bird), Lapin (headdress) and Sirvis (top). If you look closely, you’ll see that the feathers on the woman’s headdress are actually graffiti letters by Speak (top feather), Capes (middle feather), Eskae One (bottom feather).

123Klan wall featuring Scien (bottom left) and Klor (bottom right), plus guests Mark Esprit (top left) and Zek (top right)

Hsix (bottom left), Sermob (bears), Bryan Beyung (horse) and les Hommes de Lettres (top), all tied together by Monk.e.

A very large wheatpaste by Miss Me, plus one of her previously seen Portrait Of A Vandal wheatpastes top left.

Crazy Apes wall, segment 1/4: Havok on letters and Fezat on toys.

Crazy Apes wall, segment 2/4: Akuma on letters and Fezat and Korb on toys.

Crazy Apes wall, segment 3/4: Crane on letters and Fezat and Korb on toys.

Crazy Apes wall, segment 4/4: Mistx on letters and Korb on toys.

Tchug

Five Eight (top), Skor (middle) and Cemz (bottom), with a bit of help from Earth Crusher / Dré.

Acro (top) and Distort (ground). The dancing punk guy is from an earlier edition of Under Pressure.

SBU One

M’Os Geez

Tiburón

Awe

The 203 crew wall featuring, from top to bottom, Lyfer, Ekes, Naimo and Sener, with baseball player by Arnold.

Collaboration between MC Baldassari (character) and Mateo (around character).

Maliciouz

Ms Teri, with help from Sobe at the top.

Scribe

Loopkin

One Ton

One Ton, in the same door recess as below.

One Ton, in the same door recess as above.

HRKR on the wall of the terrasse of the Foufounes Electriques.

Wuna and Sly2.

Dial M wheatpaste over painted door.

Mono Sourcil representing 4U.

Labrona (humans) and Gawd (animals).

Azulejo tiles made out of sugar, by Shelley Miller.

Tava

Kat

Marc-André Giguère

Adida Fallen Angel

Jaymie Dylan

Louisa Donnelly

CA3

Cgo

IAmBatman on container.

Monstr (left) and MSHL (right) posters in windows.

MSHL (left) and Monstr (right) posters in windows.

Mirabolle posters in windows.

Dalkhafine posters in windows.

Posters by unidentified artist.

Transco

Pour le texte en français, voir un peu plus bas.

The Transco will probably be remembered as one of the greatest graffiti galleries in Montreal because of the size as well as the quality of the collection that was created within its walls. Never before had our city seen so many pieces of quality graffiti in one place. The collection of works which came to life inside the Transco was impressive in size because of the sheer dimensions of this warehouse complex (40 000 square meters), but also in quality because the building was demolished before lack of available free walls forced writers to go over each other’s works, and before the arrival of too many writers of lesser talent.

This huge warehouse, taking up most of the block within the streets St-Laurent, Chabanel, Esplanade and Louvain in today’s fashion district, started off as a military complex. It was built in 1943 by the Canadian Defense and was originally used for parachute packing for the army. After the war ended it served as an administrative office of military equipment. In the 1950s it was sold to private interests. Before its doors closed at the very beginning of 2013 it had served for a number of years as a distribution centre for the Transco Plastic Industries Inc. For over two years following its closing, the complex seems to have been visited only by urbex photographers and by an ex-employee who would squat there on and off. Around the end of May 2015 the RCD crew discovered the place with its huge rooms and thousands of square meters of virgin walls. For a few weeks they were the only ones in there, until some point into July when the SIK crew arrived. They first made it onto the roofs where they left a bit of art, then soon enough found a way in.

Because the site was easily accessible and many entryways into the buildings had been created, the gallery developed very quickly and most of the collection was created from August to November 2015. An impressive number of Montreal as well as visiting writers checked the place out at least once during that period. The place has even been used for fashion photography or for the filming of music videos. At the end of November 2015 the owners had a fence put up around the complex. That, with the arrival of winter, brought activity to a near-standstill. But the existence of a few secret entryways and the mellowness of the 2015-2016 winter have made it possible for the more dedicated writers to keep on creating there and for graffiti fans such as myself to keep on documenting the evolution of the Transco’s impressive collection.

In February 2016 teams arrived on the premises to prepare the buildings for demolition. They started by emptying the place of anything that may have still been useful and removed the asbestos inside its walls. Demolition started in the middle of March and at the end of July nothing was left of Montreal’s greatest graffiti gallery but a few piles of debris waiting to be cleared out.

My image gallery for the Transco features over 400 photos, mainly burners with a selection of throws and tags, plus a few general shots of some of the rooms. Because of its size, I had to split it up into 4 sections:

If you want to see some of the rooms in 360° as if you were there, or if you are equipped for Virtual Reality, you are welcome to Take A Tour. If you are interested in great photos of the place after it was closed but before the arrival of graffiti, check out Urbex Playground.

La Transco passera probablement à l’histoire comme étant une des plus grandes et des meilleures galeries de graffiti que Montréal aura connues. Jamais notre ville n’avait vu une aussi impressionnante quantité et qualité d’oeuvres de graffeurs en un seul endroit. La collection qui s’y est développé s’est démarquée par sa taille, étant donnée la superficie de ce complexe de salles et d’entrepots (40000 mètres carrés), mais aussi par sa qualité puisque l’endroit a été rasé avant que le manque d’espace ne pousse les graffeurs à passer par-dessus les oeuvres des autres artistes, et avant l’arrivée d’une trop grande quantité de graffeurs de moindre talent.

Cet immense complexe d’entrepots, situé à l’intérieur du quadrilatère délimité par les rues St-Laurent, Chabanel, Esplanade et Louvain dans le quartier de la mode, a d’abord été un complexe militaire. Il a été construit en 1943 par la Défense Nationale et a originellement servi à l’emballage de parachutes pour l’armée. A la fin de la guerre il a été converti en centre de gestion d’équipement militaire. Il est passé à des intérêts privés dans les années 1950. Au cours des années précédent sa fermeture au début de 2013, le complexe servait de centre de distribution pour les Industries de Plastique Transco Inc. Pendant plus de deux ans suite à sa fermeture l’endroit semble n’avoir été visité que par des photographes d’urbex ainsi que par un ancien employé qui y squattait à temps partiel. Vers la fin de mai 2015 le RCD crew a découvert l’endroit avec ses énormes pièces et ses milliers de mètres carrés de murs vierges. Ils ont été les seuls visiteurs jusqu’à ce que le SIK crew d’Ahuntsic découvre aussi l’endroit en juillet 2015. Ces derniers sont d’abord arrivés par les toits, y ont fait quelques pièces, puis ont éventuellement découvert une voie d’entrée.

Le site étant relativement facile d’accès et plusieurs voies d’entrée ayant été créées, la galerie s’est ainsi très rapidement développée et l’essentiel de la collection s’est constituée au cours des mois d’août à novembre 2015. Une très grande quantité d’artistes s’adonnant au graffiti à Montréal y est passée pendant cette période. Des équipes sont même venues y filmer des vidéos ou y faire de la photo de mode. Vers la fin de novembre les propriétaires du complexe ont cloturé l’endroit et l’hiver est arrivé, ce qui a ralenti l’activité considérablement. Mais l’existence de points d’accès demeurés relativement secrets et la clémence de l’hiver 2015-2016 ont permis aux plus tenaces de continuer à venir y pratiquer leur art et aux amateurs de graffiti tel que moi de continuer à documenter l’évolution de cette incroyable collection.

En février 2016 sont arrivées des équipes ayant le mandat de préparer l’édifice à être démoli. Celles-ci ont d’abord vidé le complexe de ce qui y avait été laissé et ont retiré l’amiante de ses murs. La démolition a débuté au milieu du mois de mars et à la fin juillet il ne restait plus rien de la plus grande galerie de graffitis que Montréal a connue.

Ma galerie-photo pour la Transco contient plus de 400 pièces, principalement des graffitis burners avec une sélection de quelques pièces plus rapides, plus quelques photos générales de l’endroit. Etant donnée sa taille, j’ai dû diviser la galerie en 4 sections:

Si vous voulez voir certaines pièces en 360° comme si vous y étiez, ou si vous possédez un casque de réalité virtuelle, vous êtes invités à jeter un coup d’oeil à Take A Tour. Si vous êtes intéressé par de superbes photos prises après la fermeture de la Transco mais avant l’arrivée des graffeurs, jetez un coup d’oeil au site de Urbex Playground.

Esplanade side, right before the place was ‘discovered’ by graffers. Photo © Google Street View.

Louvain side. Photo © Google Street View.